A Star In the Making

We’ve all been there, you forget the choreography and freeze. You look at someone, try to remember the next step. Look at your teacher. Look at your mother. You’re drawing a blank. Well, if you’re anything like this little girl, you would just be tapping to the beat of your own drum.

She also forgot her choreography, but she didn’t let her inhibitions stop her from dancing just the way she wanted to. It’s probably the most adorable thing we’ve seen all week. We see a star in the making with this little one. Can’t you too? (Huffington Post)

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What Happens When You Sync Beyoncé to an Ice Dancing Routine

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If you are in any way similar to us, you are definitely turning your TV on any chance you get to watch a bit of Winter Olympics magic. Last weekend we saw U.S. Olympians Meryl Davis and Charlie White awe the Sochi crowd with their beautiful ice dancing performance. They won by nearly 7 points with their routine called “Scheherazade,” and it was nothing short of spectacular. But Twitter will be Twitter, and people will always find a way to make something more entertaining. Several users tweeted out requests for the duo to dance to Beyoncé instead of “boring old music.” And the folks at Buzzfeed complied. They simply played Beyoncé’s “Drunk in Love” in the background of their performance and it is amazing. Almost as if Meryl and Charlie had choreographed to Beyoncé’s song all along! (Buzzfeed)

 

 

Deep Thinking of the Day

We came across this video by THNKR and were really inspired. We were also dying to hear what you think about it and your opinion about Elizabeth Streb’s ideas. In this video Streb, an American choreographer, performer, and modern dance teacher, explains her idea of SLAM (Streb Lab for Action Mechanics). Streb has some wild ideas and a lot to say about movement, construction of spaces, and a bunch of other interesting things. Let us know what you guys think about it!

The Beautiful Work of Pina Bausch Comes to Life in Movie

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We recently just watched a 3D documentary on contemporary dance choreographer Pina Bausch and were completely blown out the water! “Pina” has received stellar reviews, some who named it the best use of 3D since “Avatar.” And as you can imagine, we liked this a lot better than “Avatar…”

“Pina” has been in the makings for 20 years, and after years of labor and conceptualizing it has finally come to life. The documentary is able to capture how Pina saw things through different eyes and choreographed movements human body didn’t seem capable of doing. Her passion towards the art really shows off in German director Wim Wender’s product.

Unfortunately Pina was unable to see the finished product herself. She unexpectedly passed away in 2009, just two days before rehearsals for the film started. Wenders was devastated and almost ended the project, however Pina’s dancers convinced him to continue.

“Pina” is available for instant stream on Netflix, but we really recommend seeing it in 3D!

Preparing For A Dance Recital

Dance recitals are fun and exciting events for both the excited performers who are eager to show off what they have learned from a year of lessons and practicing, and also for the proud parents and grandparents who are just as eager to see how their favorite dancer has progressed and grown in her art.

Although dance recitals are fun, they are often hectic and can be stressful for everyone involved, especially for younger dancers and new dance parents. Here are some tried-and-true tips for surviving (and enjoying!) a child’s dance recital:

Tips for Before the Dance Recital

  • Practice: The best way to ensure a less stressful dance recital is to practice, practice, practice. Dancing in front of a crowd can create anxiety that leads to forgetfulness, and the best way to combat stage fright is to thoroughly memorize the entire dance routine. Ask the dance instructor about getting a copy of the musical selection for your child’s dance recital music and have your child practice their dance routine at home.
  • Plan: Begin planning the week before the dance recital by making a list of everything you’ll need including the costume, it’s accessories, tights, dance shoes and the teacher’s notes regarding stage makeup (how much, what kind, etc.)
  • Organize: Label all costumes and accessories with a permanent marker or sew-on labels. Keep the costume neat and clean by storing it in its original bag, or keep the costume and its accessories together in giant Ziploc bag.
  • Rest: Dance recitals can be exhausting, so it’s important to make sure your dancer goes to bed a little earlier than usual on the night before the dance recital to ensure a good night’s sleep. Some good before-bedtime activities include: reading books or listening to audiobooks, playing board games, or doing a handcraft. Television, computer and hand held video games should be avoided because these media “wake up” the brain’s activity center and make it harder to fall asleep.

Tips for During the Dance Recital

  • Before the Show: Eating and drinking while in costume is usually a big no-no, and peeling off a fitted costume to use the bathroom can be a little tricky, too, so be sure to have your little dancer have a light snack and use the bathroom before suiting up.
  • During the Show: Plan for the inevitable boredom that happens in between dance numbers. Bring books, quiet games (like portable magnetic games meant for long car trips), a small pad of paper and pencil for passing notes or playing hangman, etc. Hand-held video games are not recommended (they can be so engaging that a dance may miss her cue).

For information about choosing and caring for girls’ dance recital costumes, including some great ideas for how to find cheap dance recital costumes, check out this page ofdance recital costume tips. Although a dance recital can be stressful, remember that its sole purpose is not to be a source of anxiety, but rather to showcase a dancer’s new dance skills and celebrate the love of dance. So relax, enjoy, and celebrate this special time in your dancer’s life.

http://suite101.com/article/how-to-prepare-for-a-dance-recital-a220565

Staying in Shape over the Summer Break

The curtain goes down on yet another year of hard work, blistered toes and pirouettes.  Finally it’s time to sit back, relax, and retire your dance shoes for the summer — or is it? 

Summer is the perfect time to start a whole-body conditioning routine that will actually help you to prevent injuring yourself come the fall.  As with any other physically demanding sport or activity, the rate of injury among dancers is fairly high at 80-90%. Studies have shown that the majority of these injuries occur at the beginning of the season — that is, in the fall, when dancers are out of shape from two to three months of summer holidays.  The strength and endurance that is lost during long breaks from training leads to early fatigue when dance classes resume.

Jason Twardowski

Muscles that are fatigued are unable to provide us with the support that we need to maintain proper technique and placement, and this is the precise moment that we are the most vulnerable to injury.  In addition, the new year brings another exciting round of new choreography. The intense training and high level of repetition involved in learning and mastering a new dance piece can also lead to muscle fatigue if the dancer has not maintained sufficient strength and endurance over the summer months.

While sprained ankles, pulled hamstrings and sore backs are the war wounds of an accomplished dancer, the good news is that a significant number of these injuries are preventable by following a “healthy dancer” lifestyle, especially during the summer when you’re out of the studio.

Staying active during the summer months will help you to prevent injuries in the fall!

1) Overall body conditioning for muscular strength and cardio-vascular endurance is a must.  General strength training will help you to develop and maintain the control you need in order to execute proper technique. Exercises should include resistance/weight training for the upper body and legs as well as a core strength program consisting of not only abdominal crunches and cross crunches (right shoulder lifts up and towards left knee), but also side bridging and gluteal bridging.

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For a more difficult variation, these bridges can also be done with the upper body resting on an exercise ball.  Cardiovascular endurance training will help you to get through class without muscle fatigue. Aim to do 30 – 45 minutes of cardio workout 3 – 4 times per week, and choose lower impact activities such as cycling, swimming or elliptical to give your joints a break from the grand allegro!

2) There is no substitute for a great summer dance class.  Dropping in for a few summer classes is an important part of your proactive dance injury prevention strategy. In addition to providing you with dance specific strengthening, this will also help you keep all of the steps that you’ve worked so hard to perfect in your “muscle memory” — the coordinated sequence of movement patterns stored in your central nervous system!

3) When it comes to nutrition, garbage in = garbage out, so choose wisely.  With so much going on during the year, it’s easy to forget about good dietary habits.  Now that summer is here, take the time to clean up your act!

Due to their high level of physical activity, dancers require a minimum of 1 gram of protein per kilogram of body weight per day in order to provide sufficient building blocks for muscle growth and repair. Choose from a variety of protein sources that are low in fat.

Carbohydrates are the body’s main source of energy.  Fuel up with complex carbohydrates such as pasta, whole grain breads/cereals and starchy vegetables.  These sources will give you a much longer lasting supply of energy when compared to simple carbohydrates which are mostly sugar and are used up very quickly.

More than 70% of our body is made up of water. Adequate hydration is essential for proper muscle functioning and energy metabolism, and this is particularly important in the summer heat. Drink 2 liters of water each day. In addition, drink sufficient fluids during exercise to replace the water you are losing to sweat.

4) Use the summer break to get the care you need for existing injuries.  If you were not able to take enough of a break during the year in order to let your injuries fully heal, now is the time — before the problem becomes recurrent!  Follow the R.I.C.E. protocol — Rest (from the aggravating activity), Ice, Compression and Elevation.Note that while you are resting from activities that aggravate your injury, it is still important to keep up your overall strength and endurance in any way that you can so as to prevent de-conditioning.  Know when to get the help that you need. Seek professional care when you are in extreme pain, or if you have pain that persists for more than 2 days.

These basic tips for being a “healthy dancer” not only apply during the summer, but are an excellent strategy for preventing injury the whole year round.

Dance safe, stay healthy and have a great summer!

Reprinted from The Healthy Dancer by Dr. Jason Twardowski. Dr. Twardowski is a classically trained dancer.

http://www.dancescape.com/ezine/wellness/staying-in-shape-summer

Summer registration is now open! Visit our website for a full list of summer classes available!

Tremaine Dance Competition

On April 13th & 14th, we will competing and studying @TremaineDance! We are excited to have this opportunity to further our dance education in a positive and motivational environment through master classes with top professional choreographers from Los Angeles and New York. Tremaine Dance was founded by Joe Tremaine about 20 years ago. Joe used to have a studio in Los Angeles and has trained many famous dancers. This is an excellent opportunity for our students to broaden their horizon as dancers.

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Advice From the Parent of a Dancer

We had the opportunity to talk with Bob Schwartz, father of the very talented dancer, Evan Schwartz, former dancer of A Step in Time Dance, who is now studying at Julliard. Bob gave us some great advice on what is required of the parents of dancers.

N: How long has Evan been dancing?

B: Since he was 6 years old.

N: When did you know that Evan would be interested in becoming a professional dancer?

B: Around the time he was in 6th grade. He seemed to really take an extra interest in dance.

N: What can you tell us about being the parent of a dancer and what kind of advice can you give to other parents?

B: I lead a soccer program and coach thousands of kids as well as other coaches. My other children are athletes, however, Evan is my only child who will become a professional in his field. My advice to other parents is, don’t put pressure on your kids. Pay for their classes, chauffeur them back and forth from rehearsals and sit back and support them by letting them have fun. So many stage parents put too much pressure on their children. Even when the child is extremely passionate about a particular sport or activity, if they have a parent pushing them too hard, the child will inevitably lose interest. I didn’t put that pressure on my son, I just  supported him by going to his performances and told him “have fun.”

N: Thank you Bob! We hope this information you have shared with us is a great help to other parents!

 

For more information on A Step in Time Dance, please visit us at www.AStepinTimeDance.com